What Causes Anxiety?

The Anxiety Cause Can Be Mysterious

Those of us who suffer from anxiety often wonder, “What causes anxiety?”  Really, the anxiety cause is no mystery.

In today’s highly technical, speeding world, anxiety has become rampant. Most of us have some anxiety about finances, our family, our health, our future.

We can’t avoid anxiety-provoking news of world terrorism, economic collapse, diseases, environmental destruction, global warming.

This is no doubt part of the anxiety cause for so many of us are experiencing non-stop anxiety that can become an anxiety disorder. Why this is happening and what you can do about it are the reason for this article.

I used to have nearly constant anxiety.

It was preventing me from – well from everything.  It kept me from feeling comfortable and happy.  From doing what I wanted to do professionally.  And it was torture on my poor body – I was afraid it would ruin my health.

That’s why I became passionate about learning as much as I could about what causes anxiety and about anxiety cures.  I had to learn about healing anxiety for my own survival.

What I’ve read and what I’ve done has taught me that it is possible to to overcome anxiety and live in a calm and confident state, even in uncertain times.

Now here’s some info about the how doctors have described and classified the types of anxiety we humans get.

Anxiety and Depression Often Happen Together

Common Anxiety Disorders

Here’s an overview of the most common anxiety disorders.

They can each range from very mild to a serious disability needing specialized medical treatment.

These conditions can be triggered by many things.  The triggers can include recent or decades-old trauma, environmental stressers like toxins or radiation, diet, genetic predisposition and the habit of repetitive anxious thinking and reacting.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder – GAD
This is the most common anxiety disorder.  It starts with repeated anxious thoughts and emotions.  It becomes labeled as GAD when it’s chronic for six months or more.

If you have Generalized Anxiety Disorder, you may feel nervous, jittery, edgy or irritable, and you might find it hard to focus and think clearly.  You may get tired easily or be chronically exhausted.  You might have a hard time relaxing and sleeping, and your muscles may be constantly tight.

Having GAD means you’re constantly on the alert – mentally and physically.  Your body is in anxiety cause of fight or flight all the time.  It’s tiring.  And it’s really bad for your health.

I know.  GAD is what I had.

Mine was luckily a fairly mild case and wasn’t noticeable to others.  But it was obvious to me.  It wore my body down and kept me from really succeeding in my life.  My declining health was the wake-up call I needed to get help and take action.

What causes anxiety in the case of GAD, can be a single big T Trauma, or a series of smaller traumas.

Traumatic Events Can Cause Ongoing Mental, Emotional and Physical Problems

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
With obsessive-compulsive disorder, you keep repeating obsessive thoughts or actions.  With OCD it can feel like you have no control over your thoughts and urges, like your a victim of your thoughts. It can really wear you down.

The anxiety that causes the obsessive thoughts leads to compulsive behaviors, in an attempt to relieve the anxiety.  These behaviors can be rituals like repeatedly washing your hands, checking locks, counting things.

Panic Disorder
Panic disorder is diagnosed when you have repeated panic attacks. With a panic attack, the heart beats fast.

What goes on in your body – the physical sensations – in a panic attack, can be terrifying themselves. It can feel like you’re losing control, having a heart attack or even dieing.

Phobia Disorder
Phobia disorder is a fear of dieing or losing control in a certain situation.  This creates a need to avoid that situation. People can have a phobia of just about anything.  Some common phobias are of heights, snakes, flying and fear of panicking in an elevator or in public.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Post-traumatic stress disorder happens after experiencing a traumatic event or serious emotional shock.  PTSD can be caused by witnessing a violent or horrifying event or experiencing an emotional or physical injury.  PTSD often results when we suffer a shock when we feel helpless.

These are the many answers to “What causes anxiety?”

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Comments

  1. I am happy there is more information about anxiety now as I have has it for a while. I have bookmarked you to see what else there is for him. Thanks to you for your help

  2. Carol ansel says:

    I am working too much and need to change something to relax but I feel very pressured. Looking for answers and thanks for your post. I am happy there is more information about anxiety now as I have has it for a while.

  3. Paul David says:

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  14. Emily says:

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  15. Emily says:

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